Americans for Job Security

Americans for Job Security has existed since 1997.[1] As the group describes itself, “AJS has been organized as a 501(c)(6) business league. Under the law, this type of organization is designed to promote the ‘common business interests’ of its members.”[2] However, the group may have flouted the political limitations of its nonprofit status. Per complaints filed by the Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, “72.2% of AJS’ total spending in [fiscal 2010] was for independent expenditures and electioneering communications,” which would seemingly violate IRS guidelines for nonprofits.[3] The group also allegedly violated FEC requirements that committees engaged in political activity register and file the pertinent reports.[4]

Like many other Koch network members, AJS shifts money back and forth with its partners. In the 2012 cycle, AJS received $4.9 million from the Center to Protect Patient Rights, another member of the network.[5] However, during the same cycle, AJS also gave CPPR over $24 million.[6] As summed up by the Center for Responsive Politics, “the AJS grant to CPPR is curious, because in late 2011 the money went in the other direction: CPPR gave a generous grant of $4.8 million to AJS, according to OpenSecrets.org research. The apparently reversible pipelines of funds show how some some conservative groups shuttle money back and forth to one another, adding multiple layers of protection for donors who don’t want their names revealed.”[7]

This protection proved invaluable after AJS and associated groups broke California law in 2012. Californians filed a complaint about a $11 million donation made by Americans for Responsible Leadership with California’s Fair Political Practices Commission, which then ordered ARL to disclose its donors in compliance with California law. After losing a legal challenge to the Commission’s order, ARL then “identified the true source of the contribution as Americans for Job Security, through a second intermediary, The Center to Protect Patient Rights. Under California law, the failure to disclose this initially was campaign money laundering. At $11 million, this is the largest contribution ever disclosed as campaign money laundering in California history.”[8]

[1]About Americans for Job Security.” Accessed 10/01/15

[2]About Americans for Job Security.” Accessed 10/01/15

[3]Federal Election Commission MUR 6538: In the matter of Americans for Job Security & Stephen DeMaura, individually and in his capacity as treasurer.” 03/08/12

[4]Federal Election Commission MUR 6538: In the matter of Americans for Job Security & Stephen DeMaura, individually and in his capacity as treasurer.” 03/08/12

[5]Americans for Job Security – Donors, 2012 cycle.” The Center for Responsive Politics, accessed 10/02/15

[6]Americans for Job Security gave huge grant to CPPR.” Viveca Novak and Robert Maguire, The Center for Responsive Politics, 10/07/13

[7]Americans for Job Security gave huge grant to CPPR.” Viveca Novak and Robert Maguire, The Center for Responsive Politics, 10/07/13

[8]Americans for Responsible Leadership admits money laundering, discloses $11 million donor.” California Fair Political Practices Commission, 11/5/12