January 27, 2016 / Press Releases

Deborah Ross Endorsed by End Citizens United PAC

WASHINGTON – Today, End Citizens United (ECU) PAC officially endorsed Deborah Ross for the U.S. Senate in North Carolina.  End Citizens United is a grassroots-funded organization that is dedicated to electing members of Congress who will fight to overturn Citizens United and advocate for campaign finance reform to remove “dark money” from our political system.

“Deborah knows we need to end the rigged system in Washington where the lobbyists and corporate special interests are drowning out the voices of voters,” said Reed Adamson, Senior Advisor for End Citizens United.  “We’re proud to support Deborah, and we know she is the best candidate to rein in the unlimited and undisclosed money that is corrupting our democracy.”

“The Citizens United ruling opened the floodgates for billionaires to play in our elections with unlimited and untraceable amounts of money,” said Deborah Ross. “End Citizens United knows that in our democracy, individual interests come first, and I am proud to have their support in this U.S. Senate campaign.”

End Citizens United supports candidates who are committed to campaign finance reform. As a legislator, Ross worked to rein in the corrupting influence of big campaign contributions and was praised and honored for her campaign transparency by campaign finance watchdogs.

End Citizens United PAC was established in March 2015 to counter the disastrous effects of Citizens United and reform our campaign finance system.  ECU has raised more than $7 million from more than 500,000 contributions, with an average contribution of $14.  To date, more than one million grassroots supporters have signed their name to an online petition calling for a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United.

The complete press kit from ECU is available by clicking here.

Read more on End Citizens United from Roll Call: Campaign Finance Reform PAC Wants to Be a Player in 2016.

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